VIDEO: Microbiome science draws a crowd at first-ever symposium

A recap of the 2019 Front Range Microbiome Symposium. Video by Ron Bend. 

The first-ever Front Range Microbiome Symposium at Colorado State University, April 19, drew hundreds of attendees from across the region and covered a wide spectrum of microbiome scientific topics. In addition to research poster presentations and networking, attendees also heard from two keynote speakers: Jill Banfield of University of California Berkeley’s Innovative Genomics Institute, and Ed Yong, a science writer with The Atlantic.

Prize winners

Several research presenters also came away with prizes.

Poster presentations: 

Josue Rodriguez-Ramos, graduate student, CSU: “More than meets the eye: the influence of viruses in river microbial communities”

Emily Kraus, graduate student, Colorado School of Mines: “Biological methane cycling in serpentinization-impacted fluids and implications for methane isotopic biosignatures”

Michael Vega, graduate student, Colorado School of Mines: “Influence of diatom photosynthesis on denitrification activity within a benthic, open water wetland biomat”

Raj Trikha, graduate student, CSU: “Correlating vascular dysfunction and the gut microbiome via human to mouse fecal microbiome transplantation”

John Darcy, postdoctoral researcher, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus: “A phylogenetic model for the arrival of species into microbial communities”

Elmar Pruesse, postdoctoral researcher, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus: “A flexible, batteries included, multi-omic pipeline system”

Se Jin Song, postdoctoral researcher, University of Colorado Boulder: “Large-scale comparative analysis of vertebrate gut microbiomes reveals convergence between birds and bats”

Max Bailey, undergraduate, University of Colorado Boulder: “Exposure to ambient air pollutants that the composition of the gut microbiome in adolescents from southern California”

Rapid-fire oral presentation (5 minutes): 

Nora Jean Nealon, graduate student, CSU: “Host and gut microbial metabolism of Bifidobacterium logum-fermented rice bran in healthy mice and bioavailability of antimicrobial and cancer-protective compounds”

Contributed oral presentation (15 minutes):

Keith Hazleton, postdoctoral researcher, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus: “Diet modulates Clostridioides difficile pathogenesis through host and microbe bile acid metabolism”